MEDIA

2013: PSNEUROPE - Si EXPRESSION LAUNCH

A small report in PSNEurope regarding the launch of Si Expression.

2006: SOUNDCRAFT TALKBACK

Another Talkback newsletter. It is interesting to see just how far it had progressed compared to the first issue three years earlier.

2005: LIGHTING & SOUND INTERNATIONAL

This was one of the last times we launched an analog mixing console.

2003: MONDO

By late 2003, Mondo had become interested in who this new Harman guy was and invited me for an interview. I jumped at the chance as Mondo is a well respected industry magazine. I had no idea they were going to do such a big article on me.

2003: SOUNDCRAFT TALKBACK

In January 2003, I joined Harman as Managing Director of Soundcraft. Talkback was the Soundcraft newsletter and this is the first publication.

2001: BROADCAST COMMUNICATIONS EUROPE

In 2001, I was leading a team at Pace who were focussed on the future of television and home connectivity. The objective was to help move Pace into new product areas by imagining and exploring possibilities. During this time, I was very progressive at giving lectures and interviews with a view to help increase awareness in Pace's technology leadership.

2001: CNBC POWER LUNCH

In 2001 I was asked to appear on the lunchtime slot of CNBC. Every lunchtime they discussed various areas of technology and it was all broadcast live. On the way to the studio, we got stuck in traffic and really didn't think we would make it. With less than a minute to go until we were on air, we arrived at the studio and ran as fast as we could. Door's were held open as all the security guards had been informed that we were arriving. I arrived on set as the ten second countdown had begun. I was mic'd up as I walked to my seat. And then we went on air. You can see me trying hard to stay composed.

2000: BBC2 THE FUTURE OF TELEVISION

In 1999, I was asked to appear on a programme entitled "The Future Of Television" to be aired on BBC2 and yet another programme discussing digital television. It was a very popular subject then.

1999: BBC2 THE OPEN UNIVERSITY

In 1999, I was asked to appear on an Open University programme entitled "Boxing Clever" discussing digital television.

1997: BBC1 TOMORROW'S WORLD

On 8th October 1997, I made my debut on television when I represented Pace and shared my view on the future of digital television. It all seemed so futuristic back then, but it has far superceded all our imagination.

1989: STUDIOMASTER IMP1 & MA36

In 1989, Studiomaster launched the IMP1 (Intelligent Muting Processor) which was basically a simple computer controller muting system. But more interesting than the IMP1 was the MA36 which was a small MIDI analyser.

1989: STUDIOMASTER MA36

It has amazed me that no one has copied this product even today as it was such a simple idea but such a useful tool. I worked with one other guy from Studiomaster as a skunk project - we designed the whole thing between the two of us outside of work, which in those days was an acceptable practice. But in the end, we 'gave' the idea to Studiomaster and it went into volume production. When I joined Harman in 2003, I was amazed to see several MA36's being used both in R&D and in Production.

1987: STUDIOMASTER IDP1

IDP1 got a lot of coverage, just by the nature of it's novelty. Very shortly after IDP1 was launched, Drawmer lauched a very similar product, so it was apparently that I wasn't the only one who had the idea!

1987: STUDIOMASTER IDP1

By 1987, the computer games industry had collapsed. I had also met my future wife who had politely asked me to get a 'real' job. So I stopped being self-employed and joined a small music company called Studiomaster. One of my first products was IDP1 (Intelligent Dynamics Processor) which was the first dynamics processor in the world to incorporate a microcontroller in order to 'intelligently' control the dynamic range of the audio. I used a 6502 based controller as a DSP engine, although the audio remained in the analog domain.

1985: MICROVOX MUSIC SAMPLER

MICROSOFT started to sell very well and by December 1985 it had its first review in a music magazine. One Two Testing hit the nail on the head when they said "with Microvox, you get what a lot of other people have paid for: the hours that Andrew Trott put in to turn his private obsession into a commercial product...." SO very true..!!

1985: MICROVOX MUSIC SAMPLER

During 1984 I had started to get fed up with computer games and my attention had very much changed to computer music, which was starting to become huge. So during 1985, I developed a hardware & software sampler which very much based on the Fairlight CMS. The Fairlight cost may ten of thousands of dollars and was way beyond a megre budget. It had been famous on Frankie Goes To Hollywood's 'Relax' and was increasingly used in modern music. By late 1985, my product called MICROVOX was ready to be launched.

1985: MIKRO MAN INTERVIEW & QUINX COMPUTER GAME

In 1985 at the age of 22, I and the Supersoft owners were interviewed by Commodore magazine. This article was such an ego boost and I can remember going to my local newsagents and opening some of the magazines at the interview page hoping that people might recognise me - nobody did! But it was a buzz. In the same magazine, my new game QUINX was reviewed. QUINX was my first original game and it received a pretty reasonable rating.

1984: A COUNTRY GARDEN COMPUTER GAME

Another game I had written whilst at college was A COUNTRY GARDEN, on the Commodore Vic 20. By mid 1984, I was fully self-employed, so writing computer software was my living. I therefore decided to finish 'A COUNTRY GARDEN' and release it. This magazine gave it a very strong review of 80%.

1984: STIX ADVERT

Back in the early / mid 80's, Supersoft were one of the larger more proactive software distributors. They started to have quite a lot of success with some of their titles including STIX and so they went up a level with their advertising. This advert was a whole page and STIX held a main stage.

1984: XERONS COMPUTER GAME

Whilst I was still at college, I had written a number of games for my own enjoyment, but they were not completed to 'production' grade. After the success of STIX, I wanted to release a new game ASAP and resurrected XERONS which was a spin on Galaxians (for those of you who remember it!) It took me just a few weeks to complete and then we put it out as a new game.

1984: STIX COMPUTER GAME

In the very early days of personal computer games, many games authors copied ideas from arcade games, myself included. But by 1984 the computer games industry was changing very rapidly and originality started to become an important factor in order to sell games. So in this review, although receiving 8/10 for graphics, STIX only received 5/10 for originality and therefore it scored a disappointing 6/10.

1984: STIX COMPUTER GAME

Another review for STIX, getting 5/5 and a 90% value for money rating. And it also appeard on the front cover of the magazine so I was very happy with this.

1983: MIKRO ASSEMBLER

I wasn't just writing computer games, although that was certainly my first love. In the early 80's, there were very little software tools, so writing software of any kind was a labourious task and the language of choice then was BASIC which ran increadibly slowly. I had known from an early stage that to do anything that ran quickly would mean writing in machine code via assembly language. But there were no good assemblers available, so I decided to write my own. I spent the summer of 1982 in my Dad's shed writing MIKRO, which linked into the Commodore operating system to compile 6502 assmembly language. I didn't know it at the time, but MIKRO went on to become a popular tool for writing code on the Commodore computers.

1983: STIX COMPUTER GAME

Another review for STIX only this time it was a much stronger review, scoring 7's & 8's out of 10. And in the same magazine, they started giving the 'hit parade' of computer games, which showed that STIX was at number two.

1983: STIX COMPUTER GAME

This was the first time STIX had been reviewed. It wasn't the best review in the world, but it wasn't bad and I was just so proud to see my game in the press.

1983: STIX COMPUTER GAME

At the tender age of 20, and whilst still at college, I had written a computer game called STIX, which was based on the arcade game QIX. In those days, drawing very fast bitmapped straight lines was not an easy task and I developed an algorithm which required very few processing cycles. The game ended up being a massive success, just because of this feature, which seems so basic by today's standards, but it was novel back then. This was also the first time my name appeared in any press article, so I was very proud.

1983: STIX COMPUTER GAME

Amazingly enough, somebody has uploaded the original STIX game being played to YouTube! Thank you who ever you are!